Popular Culture and Philosophy

A blog for contributors and editors by Series Editor, George A. Reisch

Doctor Who and Philosophy, Regenerated

Posted on | February 25, 2014

Call for Abstracts:
Doctor Who and Philosophy, Regenerated
Edited by Courtland Lewis and Paula Smithka

Abstracts are sought for potential contributions to a collection of philosophical essays examining Doctor Who. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series. Potential contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic, but priority will be given to authors who wish to write on the following topics.  To ensure quality, author submissions will be provisionally accepted based on their abstract, but final acceptance will occur only after a completed draft of the chapter is submitted.

  • Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism: Could the Doctor Have Avoided Trenzalore?
  • Dalek Psychology: When Being Crazy is an Improvement
  • It’s a Mad, Mad Dalek World
  • Impure Dalek—Problems in Species Self-Identity and Insanity…
  • Self-Sacrifice, Dying, and Resurrection: Clara and Surviving the Doctor’s Life
  • Multiple Selves Across Time: How Impossible is the “Impossible” Girl?
  • Empathy for the Monster: When You Care More for “Monsters” than Humans
  • Why the Doctor Should Forget His Genocide or Should He?: Philosophy of Forgetting
  • The Virtue of Running and Hiding: Nonviolence in Doctor Who
  • When Self-Sacrifice Becomes Suicide: The Recurring Deaths of the Ponds
  • Is Doctor Who a Religion?/Religious Themes and Imagery in Doctor Who
  • Relationships in Doctor Who: Marriage, Polygamy, Bestiality, Lizardality, Alienality
  • Let’s Give Peace a Chance: Using the Veil of Ignorance to Achieve Peace
  • Forgiveness vs. Justice: Dinosaurs and Town Called Mercy
  • The Value of Difference: We’re all “Almost People” Underneath
  • Wearing “Shimmers”: Lying and Deception in Doctor Who
  • Tolerance and Intolerance in Doctor Who
  • Beauty and the Sublime: Aesthetics In or Of Doctor Who
  • Beyond Time Travel: More Science in Doctor Who

Potential contributors are encouraged to write creative, fun, philosophical essays inspired by or about the Doctor Who series. Essays must be written in an accessible, jargon-free style for general, non-academic readers.  Topics that appeared in Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside will not be accepted, unless there is overwhelming need to revisit a particular topic.  Potential contributors are also encouraged to examine other books in the Popular Culture and Philosophy Series while developing their ideas (for example, The Simpsons and Philosophy, SpongeBob SquarePants and Philosophy, and of course, Doctor Who and Philosophy).

Contributor Guidelines:

  • A brief abstract (200-500 words)
  • Author’s/Co-authors’ CV(s)/resume(s)
  • Submission deadline: March 31, 2014 (selections made by April 20, 2014)
  • Final draft of paper deadline: July 20, 2014, unless noted otherwise
  • Abstracts and CVs/resumes must be submitted via e-mail to: doctorwhoandphilosophy@gmail.com

Please post this CFA or forward to anyone writing or working in fields closely related to philosophy who might be interested in contributing.

Dracula and Philosophy, CFA is here

Posted on | February 24, 2014

Call for Abstracts
Dracula and Philosophy
Edited by Nicolas Michaud and Janelle Pötzsch

The Popular Culture and Philosophy Series

 Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to the  original Dracula book, films, comics or the TV series.

***The 10 to 12-paged papers are written in a conversational style***

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and CV’s: March 30th, 2014
  2. Notification of accepted abstracts: April 9th
  3. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: April 27th

Kindly submit abstract (with or without Word attachment) and CV by email to: Nicolas Michaud (micn0001@unf.edu).

Possible themes and topics might include, but are not limited to, questions such as…

Moral Questions: Can we justify the killing of Dracula?
Social Questions: The English vampire and reverse colonialization
Epistemic Questions: What is it like to be a bat?
Philosophy of Science: Darwin and degeneracy

Or any other though-provoking philosophical issue brought up by Dracula!

For Example,

  • Temptations of the flesh: Vegetarianism and Dracula
  • Can vampires be murderers? Moral agency in Dracula
  • Utilitarianism and hunting vampires: Does the end justify the means?
  • The brides of Dracula: Foucault on sexuality
  • Renfield and Aristotle: Is there a thing like a ‘born slave’?
  • Dracula and philosophy of religion
  • Hannah Arendt and the banality of evil
  • Dead and loving it: Max Scheler and the function of laughter
  • The vampire and me: Martin Buber’s I and Thou
  • ‘What manner of man is this?’ The problem of identity in Dracula
  • What’s life anyway? Bioethics in Dracula
  • Jonathan Harker and the problem of free will
  • Dracula and Nietzsche’s view on man
  • Threats of the New Woman: Butler and sexual deviancy
  • Dracula in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Potentials and threats of modern technology
  • The vampire as capitalist: A Marxian reading of Dracula
  • “Seward’s Folly”: Robert Merton and the ideals of science

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

To propose ideas for future volumes in the Open Court series please contact the Series Editor,

George A. Reisch, at: pcpideas@gmail.com.

Thank you!
Nicolas Michaud

The Walking Dead and Philosophy, the Sequel: CFA

Posted on | February 5, 2014

Call for abstracts
The Walking Dead and Philosophy
Wayne Yuen, Editor

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the AMC television series and Image comic book series “The Walking Dead.” This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series, and specifically the previous volume of The Walking Dead and Philosophy:  Zombie Apocalypse Now.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to the Television series, comics, or novelizations of The Walking Dead. Possible topics include:

Prisoners of War and the treatment of Andrea/ or Randall
Walkers and the environment
Rick’s secret from the CDC and lying
Propaganda and Woodsbury
Theater or deception –Ezekiel and his tiger
The role of sport in Society – Gladiatorial combat in Woodsbury
Race in the Walking Dead
Rational suicide in a world of walkers
Maggie and the Governor’s interrogation
Glenn and Torture
Familial obligations –Darryl and Merle
Mental health and Rick’s hallucination
PTSD and Rick/Morgan
Can Rick trust his senses?
Walkers and Free will
Guns, weapons, and children
Just war theory and Woodsbury/The Saviors
Rules of war
Ethics of Shane’s medical run
Searching for Sophia
The value of history: Photos for Little Ass Kicker
Human Augmentation and Merle
Triage and epidemics – Carol’s choice
Monogamy in a post-apocalyptic world
What makes Woodbury, Woodbury?
Other metaphysical issues besides mind and identity
Contributor Guidelines:
1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)
2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper
3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (e-mail preferred with MS Word attachment)
4. Submission

WALKING DEADLINE: March 31, 2014  (a completed manuscript is desired before October 2014)

Wayne Yuen (philosophyforthedead@gmail.com)
Ohlone College
43600 Mission Blvd
Fremont, CA 94539-0390

Divergent and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | January 10, 2014

Call for Abstracts

Divergent and Philosophy
Edited by Courtland D. Lewis

Abstracts are sought for potential contributions to a collection of philosophical essays examining the popular Divergent book series by Veronica Roth. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series (http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm)

Potential contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic, but priority will be given to authors who wish to write on the following topics.  In particular, each virtue (i.e. faction) needs a thorough examination.  [Note: If you wish to write on more than one faction, please rank in order of preference your top three choices.]

  • Being Dauntless: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Abnegation: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Erudite: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Amity: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Candor: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Factionless: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Being Divergent: Its virtue, role in the good life, role in preventing war, it’s vices
  • Analyzing and comparing the symbols, dress, mannerisms, and mottoes of each faction
  • Visions of utopia: Walden Too, Brave New World, 1984, and Divergent
  • War and trying to prevent it: Human causes and how to avoid it
  • “Faction before Blood”: Choosing between family and Self (i.e. faction)
  • The Goal of Knowledge: Knowledge as Power vs. Knowledge for Power
  • The use of serums as violating rights
  • Genetically pure vs. Genetically deficient: Bigotry and systemic oppression of the “different”
  • Killing/suicide vs. erasing memories
  • What is the proper ordering of society?/What are the proper virtues for basing a society on?
  • Government interference: Good or Bad, and to what extent?
  • Lying and giving false memories for the sake of the betterment of society
  • Proper means for resisting a corrupt society

Potential contributors are encouraged to write creative, fun, philosophical essays inspired by or about the Divergent series. Essays must be written in an accessible, jargon-free style for general, non-academic readers.  Potential contributors are also encouraged to examine other books in the Popular Culture and Philosophy Series while developing their ideas (for example, The Simpsons and Philosophy, Futurama and Philosophy, SpongeBob SquarePants and Philosophy).

Contributor Guidelines:

  • A brief abstract (100-500 words)
  • Author’s/Co-authors’ CV(s)/resume(s)
  • Submission deadline: March 7, 2014 (selections made by March 14, 2014)
  • Final draft of paper deadline: End of May, unless noted otherwise
  • Abstracts and CVs/resumes must be submitted via e-mail to: divergentandphilosophy@gmail.com

Please post this CFA or forward to anyone writing or working in fields closely related to philosophy who might be interested in contributing.

 

Monty Python Reunion

Posted on | November 21, 2013

Gary Hardcastle, co-editor of Monty Python and Philosophy, discoverer of the Tarski-Chapman Conjecture

Eric Idle, comedian, musician, original member of Monty Python comedy troupe

CNN called Bloomsburg University today to interview Gary Hardcastle, editor of Monty Python and Philosophy for their story about the upcoming Monty Python Reunion. Lecturing at the time about the Tarski-Chapman conjecture (regarding the status of unbound variables) Hardcastle was unavailable to take the call. In the meantime, however, CNN had located a man in London named Eric Idle to discuss the story on camera. “The mixup is unfortunate,” Hardcastle later said. “I was going to suggest they interview a cat to investigate the real meaning of the highly anticipated reunion.”

HBO’s Girls: CFA is here

Posted on | November 15, 2013

Girls and Philosophy

Edited by Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the HBO television series Girls. This volume will be published by OpenCourt Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy and The Walking Dead and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. We are seeking abstracts, but anyone who has already written an unpublished paper on this topic may submit it in its entirety. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to Girls (including other works by Lena Dunham). The editors are especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues/topics/concepts in Girls in creative and non-standard ways.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)

2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper

3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (we prefer e-mail with MS Word attachment)

4. Submission deadline: January 15, 2014 (we are looking to complete the entire ms by May 31, 2014, so early submissions are encouraged and welcomed!)

Mail:

Richard Greene
Department of Political Science and Philosophy
Weber State University
1203 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-1203

rgreene@weber.edu
rachelrobison@weber.edu

Adventure Time and Philosophy, CFA is here

Posted on | November 11, 2013

Call for Abstracts
Adventure Time and Philosophy
Edited by Nicolas Michaud

The Popular Culture and Philosophy Series

 Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to the Adventure Time TV series.

***The 10 to 12-paged papers are written in a conversational style***

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and CV’s: Monday, December 16th
  2. Notification of accepted abstracts: Wednesday, December 18th
  3. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: Monday, January 13th

Kindly submit abstract (with or without Word attachment) and CV by email to: Nicolas Michaud (micn0001@unf.edu).

Metaphysical Questions: What is the nature of reality? Is the land of Ooo real?
Moral Questions: Should we try to be heroes? When does heroism go too far?
Linguistic Questions: How does the construction of “Adventure” assume violence?
Social Questions: Are we on our way towards our own apocalyptic reality?
Epistemic Questions: How do we know we aren’t in Ooo?
Philosophy of Sex and Gender: How is gender bent in Adventure Time?

Or any other though-provoking philosophical issue brought up by Adventure Time!

For Example,
• Virtue Ethics and Heroism. What Makes a Hero?
• What does Finn Owe Jake? Animal Right in the Land of Ooo.
• Are Finn and Jake More than Friends? Homosocial Questions in Ooo.
• Is Marceline Really That Bad? The Nature of Evil.
• Can We really know Lady Rainicorn? The Inadequacy of Translation for Meaning.?
• Lumpyness and Egoism. Is it Really that Bad to be Selfish?
• How Many Gunter’s Are There? The Problem of Identity
• Is Beemo a Person? Artificial Intelligence and Morality
• Is Princess Bubblegum Really a Scientist?
• Marriage is Slavery. Feminism and the Ice King.
• Does Gender Exist? Fionna and Princess Gumball.
• When is it Ok to Blow Your Own People? Ruling the Candy People.
• Can Flame Princess Really Love?
• Creating Worlds: How Would Bishop Berkley Describe the Land of Ooo?
• Do Candy People Have Souls?
• Do Candy People Dream? How Do We Know We Aren’t in Ooo?
• Finn and Jake, BFF’s. What does “Friendship” Really Mean?
• Princess Bubblegum and Deception: When is it OK to Lie?
• Morality and Murder. When is Killing “Bad Guys” ok?
• What is the Difference Between Sense and Nonsense?
• Is the Candy Kingdom a Functioning Socialism?
• Where is Consciousness? What Happens When Beemo’s Batteries Die?
Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

To propose ideas for future volumes in the Open Court series please contact the Series Editor,

George A. Reisch, at: pcpideas@gmail.com.

Thank you!

Nicolas Michaud

 

Justified and Philosophy, Call For Abstracts

Posted on | October 28, 2013

Justified and Philosophy. Edited by Rod Carveth and Robert Arp

Contact: robertarp320@gmail.com

- Papers must frequently refer to characters, events, and stories in Justified, the popular and critically acclaimed TV series on FX
- Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: robertarp320@gmail.com
- Abstracts due: December 1, 2013.
- Notification of accepted abstracts: December 15, 2013.
- First drafts of papers due: February 15, 2014 (we’re moving quickly through production on this book).
- 3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience.

Any relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities:

- A moral analysis of Raylan’s controversial, but “justified,” quick-draw shooting of mob hit man, Tommy Bucks
- Utilitarianism and “Cleaning Up Harlan”
- Raylan as Kantian deontologist?
- Is it ever moral to enforce your own brand of justice (in your Kentucky hometown)?
- Professional Ethics: Raylan as marshal and bounty hunter
- Corporate ethics and the actions of Black Pike
- Crime or coal? The conundrum of the residents of Harlan
- When is killing “justified?”
- Virtue ethics and honoring thy Father: Bo and Boyd and Raylan and Arlo
- Mags Bennett: virtue ethics, role models, and mother as monster
- “You do what you must to protect them, even when you know it’s wrong” Mags Bennett and Loretta
- The “frenemyship” of Raylan and Boyd
- Boyd, the existence of God, and signs from God
- Boyd and the value of religion in reforming someone’s wicked ways
- Religious themes in Justified
- A serious analysis of snake handling given the Justified character, Billy St. Cyr
- The definition and nature of evil
- Critical Race Theory and issues of race and identity on Justified
- Escape one’s past? Fatalism vs. determinism in Raylan’s relationship with Harlan
- Keeping out the foreigners: Harlan versus Detroit
- The Odd Triple: Ava, Boyd, and Raylan
- The Sins of the Father? Raylan’s upcoming fatherhood
- Balance in the soul: Can Raylan resist his darkest impulses?
- Raylan and Boyd: Who’s the Ego and Who’s the Id?
- Is Raylan Givens his own man?
- “Sometimes a hat is just a hat” Freud and Raylan’s Stetson
- Mens rea: Is Quarles legally responsible for his actions?
- What’s really in the wall? The mystery of Justified’s Season 4
- Epistemological considerations in the episode “Truth and Consequences”
- Justified true beliefs on Justified
- Flying too close to the sun: The fate of Nick Augustine

Justified and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy Series:  Submit ideas for possible future PCP books to the series editor, George A. Reisch, at pcpideas at caruspub.com.

 

The Gang Gets Existential (CFA)

Posted on | September 4, 2013

Call for Abstracts:

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and Philosophy
Edited by Roger Hunt and Robert Arp
Email: regorhunt02052@gmail.com

It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia is a series on FX that has been likened to “Seinfeld on crack.” So, given that Seinfeld and Philosophy was the very first book in Open Court’s Popular Culture and Philosophy series, It’s Always Sunny is a natural fit. More importantly, the totality of episodes thus far exhibit many of the basic issues found in Western philosophy (and some Eastern philosophy), to include logic, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. It’s Always Sunny is one of FX’s most popular series ever, and on March 28, 2013 FX renewed the show for a tenth season.

(1)    Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: regorhunt02052@gmail.com (yes, it’s spelled correctly with “regorhunt…” instead of “rogerhunt…”)

(2)    Abstracts due: October 10, 2013

(3)    Notification of accepted abstracts: January 1, 2013

(4)    First drafts of papers due: April 30, 2013

(5)    Proposed Release to coincide with the beginning of season 10

(6)    3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience
(7)    Papers must frequently refer to characters, stories, situations, and/or events in It’s Always Sunny in PhiladelphiaAny relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities:
-          Is the Gang selfish, sociopathic, or solipsistic?
-          The Gang solves the identity crisis: What constitutes a self?
-          The many identities of Frank Reynolds
-          The limits of space: What is a bar?
-          Charlie’s Literacy: What does that even mean?
-          Chardee Macdennis: Rules, cheating, and games
-          Is the Gang more or less rational than its members?
-          Investigations: Breaking down the Cereal Defense
-          From Matthew to Cricket: Does God exist in Philly?
-          What is Love? Charlie and the Waitress; Frank and…
-          Consciousness and attention: Buying a boat, finding a pool, going to the Jersey Shore
-          The dark side of empathy: Dennis Reynolds on knowing the other
-          Time and memory: Who pooped the bed, or impregnated Dee?
-          The Gang gets analyzed: What is wrong with everyone!?
-          Getting racist: What are we allowed to assume or infer about others?
-          Abortion: Mac vs. Dee
-          The Nightman cometh: Childhood trauma and virtue ethics in It’s Always Sunny
-          Reverse virtue ethics: Can we know the good by exploring evil?
-          Does the Gang have a moral code?
-          Stuck in the woods: Arguing vegetarian ethics
-          Feminist critiques of Dee, the Waitress, Carmen, and Artemis
-          Dee, the Waitress, Carmen, Artemis, and the role of women
-          Campaign ethics: The Gang runs for office
-          Hands, birds, or Harvard: What is a lawyer and what are the ethical duties of a lawyer?
It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy Series:http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm. Submit ideas for possible future PCP books to the series editor, George A. Reisch, at pcpideas@caruspub.com. Thanks for your consideration.

 

Breaking Bad Breaking Good

Posted on | August 12, 2013

 

Scott Koepsell and Robert Arp’s edition of Breaking Bad and Philosophy is now out.  Inside Higher Ed’s Scott McLemee finds much to agree with, especially Ray Bossert’s chapter “Macbeth on Ice.”  Bossert’s account of Walter White’s dark magnetism is “exactly right,” McLemee says. And now there’s an interview on TrashIcons.  Philly.com has nothing but brotherly love for Walter, and Matt Skrajner weighs in here.

keep looking »

About

Since its inception in 2000, Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy® series has brought high-quality philosophy to general readers by critically exploring the meanings, concepts, and puzzles within television shows, movies, music and other icons of popular culture.

Search

Admin