Popular Culture and Philosophy

A blog for contributors and editors by Series Editor, George A. Reisch

Hamilton and Philosophy, Call for Abstracts

Posted on | April 25, 2016

Hamilton and Philosophy, CFA

Co-edited by Aaron Rabinowitz and Robert Arp

 

Hamilton: An American Musical is a cultural phenomenon that is promoting interest in revolutionary history and race in America. The show is poised to sweep the Tony Awards and will soon have productions opening nationwide and internationally. Hamilton and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy series: http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm.

- Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: aarondrabi@gmail.com

- Abstracts due: June 1st, 2016, but you can send them in sooner

- Notification of accepted abstracts: July 1st, 2016

- First draft of papers due: September 1st, 2016

- 3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience.  Papers must frequently refer to ideas, arguments, characters, events, and circumstances in Hamilton: An American Musical or the show’s production or historical source material.

Any relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities to prompt your thinking:

Ethics

- “In New York you can be a new man” Existentialism and the American Dream

- “I wrote my way out of hell” Bootstrapping and the hero’s journey

- “What’s a legacy? It’s planting seeds in a garden you never get to see” Legacy or happy experiences, which is the good life?

- “I’m never satisfied” Is unhappiness necessary for success?

- “Wait for it” In defense of patience, skepticism, pragmatism, etc.

- Burr’s calming yin and Hamilton’s raging yang

- “Laughing at my sister cuz she wants to form a harem” The ethics of open relationships, polyamory, and infidelity

- “How lucky we are to be alive right now” Angelica and living in the moment

- “That would be enough” Eliza and East/West philosophies of acceptance (stoicism, Taoism, Buddhism etc.)

Philosophy of History

- Should historical fiction be accurate?

- “A civics lesson from a slaver” Are we still ignoring the true history of slavery in America?

- The problem of “founder chic”

- Does history still belong to white men?

- “I’m Not Throwing Away My Shot” Ego and the individual in history

Political Philosophy and Social Issues

- What produces more progress, fighting or writing?

- “The unrest in France will lead to anarchy” The ethics of revolution and nation building

- “Where do we draw the line” interventionism vs isolationism

- Hamilton’s federalism and Hobbes’s strong man theory of government

- “Heed not the rabble” The dangers of majority rule

- “The room where it happens” Consequentialism in politics

- Should a society ban dueling or is that paternalistic?

- Is the federal bank a good thing or a bad thing?

- Is Hamilton really feminist? Chauvinist? Both?

- “Rise up” The intersectionality of social progress

- The omission of Hamilton’s alleged homosexuality

Epistemology

- “Who lives, who dies, who tells your story” The reliability of historical narratives

- Can fictionalizations teach us about truth?

- How do we know the right thing to do?

Philosophy of Theater

- “Your Obedient Servant” Representation of people of color and minorities in Hamilton

- Is race specific casting moral?

- Issues of non-traditional casting

- Does the cost of tickets exclude audiences?

- “What Comes Next” The future of representing minorities on Broadway

Metaphysics

- The “contradictions of independence” and whether a man “can ever be truly free”

- How the inevitability of death shapes our lives

- Destiny, purpose, and freedom in historic times

- “Death doesn’t discriminate” Does the universe care about us?

Peanut Butter and Phonetics

 Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: aarondrabi@gmail.com

Thanks for your consideration.

Aaron Rabinowitz

aarondrabi@gmail.com

Peanuts and Philosophy, CFA deadline: May 15

Posted on | April 13, 2016

Call for Abstracts

Peanuts and Philosophy, Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene, Editors

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to Charles M. Schulz’s Peanuts. This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy, The Walking Dead and Philosophy, Boardwalk Empire and Philosophy, and The Princess Bride and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. We are seeking abstracts, but anyone who has already written an unpublished paper on this topic may submit it in its entirety. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to the various iterations of Peanuts (including the comic strip, the television shows, the plays, and the movies, etc.). The editors are especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues/topics/concepts in Peanuts in creative and nonstandard ways.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)

2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper

3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (we prefer e-mail with MS Word attachment).

4. Submission deadline: Extended to May 15, 2016.

Mail:
Richard Greene
Department of Political Science and Philosophy
Weber State University
1203 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-1203
Email: 
rgreene@weber.edu
rachelrobison@weber.edu

Deadpool and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | January 27, 2016

Call for Abstracts: Deadpool and Philosophy

Edited by Nicolas Michaud and Jacob May for The Open Court Philosophy and Pop Culture Series

Please circulate and post widely. Apologies for Cross-posting.

Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to Deadpool film, comics, and games. Each chapter accepted for publication must address the character from a philosophical perspective. The chapters must be pointed and direct, engaging philosophical tools and theories to highlight insights revealed by Deadpool. This text, in particular, is an opportunity to have fun with the reader through philosophy. Authors are encouraged to be snarky, funny, and perhaps occasionally rude. But as philosophers, the last one should be no problem.

***The 10 to 12-paged papers are written in a conversational style***

Submission Guidelines:

1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and CV’s: March 1st

2. Notification of accepted abstracts: March 7th

3. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: May 1st

Kindly submit abstract (with or without Word attachment) and CV by email to: Nicolas Michaud (philosophylives@gmail.com).

Possible topics include…

• Can Deadpool be a virtuous hero and still commit murder?

• Deadpool gets paid for his good deeds. Can he truly be considered a hero?

• The 4th Wall, Existence, and Literature. What kind of existence do literary characters have if they “know” they are in a comic book?

• Deadpool seems to have a deeper awareness of self and the maya; how can that be coherent with his violence?

• Deadpool and Immortality—Is it so good to never die?

• The Virtue of Humor—Making fun of Wolverine.

• Deadpool and Camus. Our hero knows he is in a comic book but is powerless to escape, can he make meaning out of meaninglessness?

• How does Deadpool’s past reflect on the power of genetics and upbringing?

• Deadpool and the Problem of Identity. Is Deadpool really Wade Wilson?

• Which of his personalities are the “real” Deadpool?

• Why let the child die? (the Apocalypse conundrum).

• The Multiverse Paradox – Rounding up the Deadpool Corps together in one universe.

• Deadpool kills the Marvel Universe – what happens when Deadpool breaks into the “real-world” to kill  the writers?

• Deadpool and Destruction of the Self – Is hunting down all versions of himself a form of suicide?

• If one knows that one’s fate is “written” can one be said to be free?

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series. To propose ideas for future volumes in the Open Court series please contact the Series Editor, George A. Reisch, at: pcpideas@gmail.com.

Thank you!

Nicolas Michaud

David Bowie and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | September 23, 2015

Call for Abstracts

David Bowie and Philosophy

Ted Ammon, editor

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the work of David Bowie.  This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy, The Walking Dead and Philosophy, Boardwalk Empire and Philosophy, and The Princess Bride and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. I am seeking abstracts, but complete unpublished papers will be considered. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Any topic of Philosophical interest pertaining to the voluminous work of David Bowie will be considered, provided that it is written for an intelligent lay audience.  Minimize footnotes, nix obscure references, take nothing for granted regarding the philosophical background of your audience. Papers should nevertheless have serious philosophical content.

Possible areas of interest include:

  • Change
  • Religion
  • Apocalyptic and Dystopian Visions
  • Aesthetics of mixing musical genre
  • Sexuality
  • Theatrical Rock Performances
  • Musical Roots and Influences
  • The Berlin Years
  • Bowie vs. Warhol
  • Concern for Social and Political Issues
  • Bowie’s Influence on Pop Culture
  • Bowie’s famous reading list

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (500-750 words).  Full-length papers should be about 3000 words.
2. Please email abstract/paper as a WORD attachment to ammontg@millsaps.edu.
4. Submission deadline: December 1, 2015.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

PS:  Shortly I will announce a forthcoming volume on Jimi Hendrix and Philosophy.  Contributions to both editions are acceptable

Orphan Black and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | September 14, 2015

Call for Abstracts

Orphan Black and Philosophy

Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene, Editors

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the BBC television series Orphan Black. This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy, The Walking Dead and Philosophy, Boardwalk Empire and Philosophy, and The Princess Bride and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. We are seeking abstracts, but anyone who has already written an unpublished paper on this topic may submit it in its entirety. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to Orphan Black The editors are especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues/topics/concepts in Orphan Black in creative and non-standard ways.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)
2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper
3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (we prefer e-mail with MS Word attachment)
4. Submission deadline: November 15, 2015 (we are looking to complete the entire ms by March 15, 2016, so early submissions are encouraged and welcomed!)

Mail:

Richard Greene
Department of Political Science and Philosophy
Weber State University
1203 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-1203

Email: rgreene@weber.edu
rachelrobison@weber.edu

Red Rising and Philosophy

Posted on | August 13, 2015

Call for Abstracts

Red Rising and Philosophy

Submission Deadline, March 1, 2016

Edited by Courtland Lewis and Kevin McCain

Abstracts are sought for potential contributions to a collection of philosophical essays examining the Red Rising trilogy. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series (http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm). Potential contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of broad philosophical interest that pertains to the Red Rising Trilogy. Possible topics/titles include:

• Personal identity and the transformation from red to gold

• Does Darrow face an epistemically transformative experience when he decides to become gold?

• The morality of destroying the Society

• The ethics of the Institute

• The morality of casting down the proctors

• Can red and gold really be friends?

• Mustang and the duty to one’s family

• Should you prostitute yourself to feed your family?

• Is the Society a realization of Plato’s Republic?

• Lifeboat ethics and the “quality control” before entering the Institute Do cognitive enhancement drugs that we currently have represent the first step toward a Society-like culture?

• Is Darrow the same person as the Reaper?

• Is living for more the only way to have a meaningful life?

• Why Lambda never gets the Laurel: Is life fair? Why do we expect it to be fair?

• Starring at the stars: The aesthetics of what we don’t have

• Sing the Song: When should you sacrifice yourself for the greater good

• The revolutionary nature of music and dance

Potential contributors are encouraged to write creative, fun, philosophical essays inspired by or about the Red Rising series. Essays must be written in an accessible, jargon-free style for general, non-academic readers. Potential contributors are also encouraged to examine other books in the Popular Culture and Philosophy Series while developing their ideas (for example, The Simpsons and Philosophy, Futurama and Philosophy, SpongeBob SquarePants and Philosophy, and among others, Doctor Who and Philosophy).

Contributor Guidelines: Submission deadline: October 15, 2015

• Send (1) A brief abstract (200-500 words) and (2) Author’s/Co-authors’ CV(s)/resume(s)

• Abstracts and CVs/resumes must be submitted via e-mail to: redrisingandphilosophy@gmail.com

• Decisions about accepted papers will be announced by March 15, 2016

• Drafts of accepted essays will be due April 15, 2016

• Final drafts of essays will be due by May 20, 2016

Please post this CFA or forward to anyone writing or working in fields closely related to philosophy who might be interested in contributing.

X-Files and Philosophy: The CFA is Out There

Posted on | March 31, 2015

Call for Abstracts
The X Files and Philosophy: THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE
Edited by Robert Arp
robertarp320@gmail.com

- In March of 2015, it was announced that The X Files would return as a six-episode event series
- The dates for airing the episodes are under wraps, but shooting starts in the summer of 2015
- Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: robertarp320@gmail.com
- Abstracts due: June 1, 2015, but you can send them in sooner
- Notification of accepted abstracts: July 1, 2015
- First drafts of papers due: January 15, 2016
- I’d like to have a chapter or two dealing with topics found in the six new episodes, so abstracts for those papers will be accepted all throughout the time frame of the airing of the episodes, with a final due date for abstracts being one week after the sixth episode airs
- 3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience
- Papers must frequently refer to ideas, arguments, characters, events, and circumstances, in The X Files series, The X Files movies, The Lone Gunmen, or The X-Files: Season 10

Any relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities to prompt your thinking:

Epistemology and General Psychological Issues
- I WANT TO BELIEVE and conspiracy theorists
- I WANT TO BELIEVE and bias in our thinking
- THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE… But what is truth?
- On Scully’s claim, “Because it’s easier to believe the lie. Isn’t it?”
- Scully the skeptical scientist vs. Mulder the musing mystic
- The definition and nature of skepticism and the skeptic
- Can anecdotal evidence, stories, and/or alleged sightings ever count as reliable evidence?
- Orison, doing God’s work, and psychosis
- Orison, Dr. Heitz Werber, and Is there any scientific credibility to hypnosis?
- “Blood” and various forms of mental psychosis

Philosophy of Science
- Cryptozoology and the issue of demarcation in science
- Are there legitimate instances of underdetermination in X Files episodes?
- “I want to believe,” and faith in things non-scientific
- A minutia of Mulder, and the persistence of “faith” in the history of science
- On Doggett’s claim: “You know, these words—‘anomalous,’ ‘supernatural,’ ‘paranormal’—they propound to explain something by not explaining it. That’s lazy!”

Logic and Reasoning
- I WANT TO BELIEVE and fallacies
- I WANT TO BELIEVE and jumping to conclusions
- The Lone Gunmen and (possibly other Associates such as The Thinker and Kimmy the Geek) as archetypes of reasoning and problem solving
- The Liar paradox and any number of the Cigarette-Smoking Man’s claims

General Metaphysical Issues
- THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE… and various forms of realism and antirealism
- Mulder, Scully, and the nature of friendship
- Various conceptions of evil in X Files stories
- Eastern myths in X Files stories
- Porphyria, hypertrichosis, sleeping sickness, necrosis, and other diseases reported in the scientific community and the origin of folklore concerning “monsters” such as vampires, werewolves, and zombies
- Feminism and Scully as the atypical woman
- The nature of ghosts, astral presences, and other apparitions in X Files stories
- “Ghost in the Machine” and what counts as conscious existence
- From “Jose Chung’s From Outer Space”: “Your scientists have yet to discover how neural networks create self-consciousness, let alone how the human brain processes two-dimensional retinal images into the three-dimensional phenomenon known as perception.”
- Aliens, mandroids, and functionalism in the X Files
- “Lazarus,” “One Breath,” and an investigation of near-death experiences
- “Miracle Man,” “Humbug,” magical/incredible feats, and charlatans
- Existentialist themes in the X Files
- “Clyde Bruckman’s Final Repose,” freedom, and determinism
- On the Cigarette-Smoking Man’s claim that, “Men can never be free. Because they’re weak, corrupt, worthless, and restless.”
- On Skinner’s claim: “Every minute of every day we choose. Who we are. Who we forgive. Who we defend and protect. To choose a side or to walk the line. To play the middle. To straddle the fence between what is and what should be. This was the course I chose. Trying to find the delicate balance of interests that can never exist. Choosing by not choosing.”
- Words of wisdom from “Musings of a Cigarette-Smoking Man”
- On Scully’s question: “Is there a plan, a purpose or a reason to our existence?”
- “Biogenesis” and eternal flux
- “Empedocles” and Empedocles
- “Providence” and providence
- “Essence” and the nature of life

Ethics
- Should the government ever have any secrets that it keeps from its citizens?
- Lying vs. not revealing the facts
- The moral limits of experimentation using humans
- The tension between the agents’ desire to find the truth and their duty to secure criminal convictions
- “Eve” and the issue of cloning
- Characters that exhibit a Kantian-based deontology, a Millian-based utilitarianism, and/or an Aristotelian-based virtue ethics
- “Fearful Symmetry” and issues in environmental ethics
- “Wetwired” and whether one is justified in killing an innocent person being used as a tool of harm
- On Jeremiah Smith’s claim, “I no longer believe in the greater purpose.”
- On Skinner’s claim, “When you compound the lies, you compound the consequences.”
- What happens when we DENY EVERYTHING?

Political Philosophy and Social Issues
- On the correlation between the emergence of UFOs and aliens in science fiction of the 20th Century and the preponderance of supposed UFO sightings and alien abductions beginning in the 20th Century
- Mulder’s non-scientific hypothesis is usually (if not always) right, Scully’s commonsense, scientific hypothesis is usually (if not always) wrong, and the effect of the paranormal (X Files, but also Monster Hunters, and Ancient Aliens) on the gullible and/or ignorant public
- Deep Throat and the real Deep Throat
- Crop circles and other phenomena we know are explained by human or other natural means, but yet still persist as the supposed “unexplained” in the mind of the public
- Brainwashing and propaganda used and/or sanctioned by the government
- Capitalism as a driver for “keeping the legend going”—people pay lots of money for ghost tours, souvenirs, knickknacks, vacation packages, etc.
- “Gender Bender,” queer theory, and social pressures concerning identity and sexuality
- Area 51 and supposed government cover-ups
- On the Cigarette-Smoking Man’s claim, “We give them happiness, and they give us authority.”

Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: robertarp320@gmail.com

The X Files and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy Series: http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm. Submit ideas for possible future PCP books to the series editor, George A. Reisch, at pcpideas@gmail.com.

Thanks for your consideration.

The Princess Bride and Philosophy? Inconceivable!

Posted on | February 4, 2015

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS:

The Princess Bride and Philosophy

Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene, Editors

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the William Goldman book and subsequent movie The Princess Bride. This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy, The Walking Dead and Philosophy, and Girls and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. We are seeking abstracts, but anyone who has already written an unpublished paper on this topic may submit it in its entirety. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to The Princess Bride. The editors are especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues/topics/concepts in The Princess Bride in creative and non-standard ways.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)

2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper

3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (we prefer e-mail with MS Word attachment)

4. Submission deadline: April 15, 2015 (we are looking to complete the entire ms by June 15, 2015, so early submissions are encouraged and welcomed!)

Mail: Richard Greene
Department of Political Science and Philosophy
Weber State University
1203 University Circlegden, UT 84408-1203

Email: rgreene@weber.edu, rachelrobison@weber.edu

Louis CK and Philosophy, Call For Abstracts

Posted on | December 31, 2014

Louis CK And Philosophy
Mark Ralkowski, editor

“Over the course of the past year or so, Louis C.K. has made a remarkable evolution from being merely one of our most beloved and respected artists—a man his colleagues and peers talk about with hushed awe and total reverence—to being something of a contemporary folk hero—a balding, ginger, slightly overweight standup comedy Robin Hood speaking truth to power and reclaiming the means of distribution from the nefarious likes of Ticketmaster.”–Nathan Rabin, on the growing appeal of Louis C.K.

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to Louis CK. This volume will focus equally on the increasingly popular FX network series Louie, Louis CK’s stand-up comedy specials (such as Shameless, Chewed Up, Hilarious, Live at the Beacon Theater, and Oh My God), notable interviews, and anything else Louis CK has said or written that is worthy of philosophical consideration. Open Court Publishing will publish this volume as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series in 2015.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to Louis CK. The editor is especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues in Louis CK’s comedy and writing in creative and non-standard ways.

See LCK-Topics and Quotations (pdf) for a list of topics and quotations that may be helpful for brainstorming.

Contribution guidelines:
1. Abstract of chapter (100-300 words)
2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the chapter
3. Submission deadline for abstracts: January 23, 2015
4. Email submissions to the editor at louisck.philosophy@gmail.com

Note:
If the editor invites you to be a contributor to the book, the first draft of your chapter will be due April 1, 2015. Final drafts will be expected by May 1, 2015.


Community and Philosophy, CFA. Deadline 11.28.14

Posted on | July 23, 2014

Call for Abstracts:
Community and Philosophy

Edited by Courtland Lewis

Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to Community and its Six Seasons and a Movie. The chapters must be clear and direct, engaging philosophical concepts and theories to highlight the merits and the flaws of Community. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series.

Contributor Guidelines:

Abstracts should be 100-500 words, and contain a precise and clear thesis.

Abstracts are Due: Nov. 28, 2014

Submit abstract and CV by email to: Courtland Lewis at communityandphilosophy@gmail.com

Final Papers should be 10 to 12 pages, written in a conversational style.

Topics in area of Philosophy will be accepted, but possible topics include

• You Can’t Play! The dangers of exclusion and why Pierce and Chang are Evil.

• Is the Study Group a Community? The nature of community.

• Annie’s Boobs: Deception and using sexuality to get what you want.

• You Can’t Disappoint a Picture! Disappointment and disappointing others: Sartre’s Psychology of Being.

• Not Everything is Meta. What is Metaphysics, is it valuable, and why does Abed care so much about it?

• Is that a New Stereotype? The nature and logic behind stereotypes, and why they’re so funny (sometimes!)

• I’m Not Just a Fan, I’m an Academic. What’s the role of academia play in examining pop culture?

• Are “Blow Off” Courses Good? What’s the proper way to engage and educate?

• Do You Want that Toasted: If Subway Ran Education. Should schools be publically or privately funded? What’s the proper way to run a school?

• Don’t Roll that Dice! The Nature of Possible Worlds and Evil/Prime Timelines.

• The First to Untie Me Gets an ‘A’. Cornwallis and the Prisoner’s Dilemma.

• Can We Do Something About the Mold in the East Stairwell? Environmental Ethics through the eyes of Green-dale.

• If You Think That’s Insensitive, then Listen to This. The goods and evils of political correctness.

• “I’m a Human Being!” The nature of being human.

• E Pluribus Anus. What our community symbols say about us; or Pledging allegiance to the butt.

• Life Makes More Sense in Pop Culture.  Why Abed’s the most sane person at Greendale; or Living with reality through self-deception.

• The Meaning of Life. How pop culture brings meaning to life, and makes life more interesting.

• We Just Want to Belong. Why do so many want to be part of the study group?

• Excuse Me, I Have Changnesia. Personal identity and trying to change to become better

• Why Care About Friendship? Friendship is difficult, so why go to so much trouble?

• Religion, Acceptance, and Difference. When should Shirley stop trying to save her friends’ souls and just let them burn in hell

• Pierce, You’re Old. Growing old, fitting in, and remaining useful.

• Cool, Cool, Cool. The Philosophy of Abed.

• Abed, We’re Not in an Episode of Inspector Spacetime. The nature and role of Imagination.

• Who Garfunkled Whom? Can we learn anything from the communal fallout of Harmon and Chase.

• Dissecting a Debate. Which school should’ve of won the debate: Is Man Evil? And why is sex evil?

• The Ethics of Drunk-Calling. Friendship, sex, and repressed feelings.

• Whether You Leave the Jacket on, or Take it Off; You’ve Done if For Others. Do we ever do anything for ourselves, or is it always for others?

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm and http://www.popularcultureandphilosophy.com/ for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

 

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Since its inception in 2000, Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy® series has brought high-quality philosophy to general readers by critically exploring the meanings, concepts, and puzzles within television shows, movies, music and other icons of popular culture.

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