Popular Culture and Philosophy

A blog for contributors and editors by Series Editor, George A. Reisch

Community and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | July 23, 2014

Call for Abstracts:
Community and Philosophy

Edited by Courtland Lewis

Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to Community and its Six Seasons and a Movie. The chapters must be clear and direct, engaging philosophical concepts and theories to highlight the merits and the flaws of Community. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series.

Contributor Guidelines:

Abstracts should be 100-500 words, and contain a precise and clear thesis.

Abstracts are Due: October 31, 2014

Submit abstract and CV by email to: Courtland Lewis at communityandphilosophy@gmail.com

Final Papers should be 10 to 12 pages, written in a conversational style.

Topics in area of Philosophy will be accepted, but possible topics include

• You Can’t Play! The dangers of exclusion and why Pierce and Chang are Evil.

• Is the Study Group a Community? The nature of community.

• Annie’s Boobs: Deception and using sexuality to get what you want.

• You Can’t Disappoint a Picture! Disappointment and disappointing others: Sartre’s Psychology of Being.

• Not Everything is Meta. What is Metaphysics, is it valuable, and why does Abed care so much about it?

• Is that a New Stereotype? The nature and logic behind stereotypes, and why they’re so funny (sometimes!)

• I’m Not Just a Fan, I’m an Academic. What’s the role of academia play in examining pop culture?

• Are “Blow Off” Courses Good? What’s the proper way to engage and educate?

• Do You Want that Toasted: If Subway Ran Education. Should schools be publically or privately funded? What’s the proper way to run a school?

• Don’t Roll that Dice! The Nature of Possible Worlds and Evil/Prime Timelines.

• The First to Untie Me Gets an ‘A’. Cornwallis and the Prisoner’s Dilemma.

• Can We Do Something About the Mold in the East Stairwell? Environmental Ethics through the eyes of Green-dale.

• If You Think That’s Insensitive, then Listen to This. The goods and evils of political correctness.

• “I’m a Human Being!” The nature of being human.

• E Pluribus Anus. What our community symbols say about us; or Pledging allegiance to the butt.

• Life Makes More Sense in Pop Culture.  Why Abed’s the most sane person at Greendale; or Living with reality through self-deception.

• The Meaning of Life. How pop culture brings meaning to life, and makes life more interesting.

• We Just Want to Belong. Why do so many want to be part of the study group?

• Excuse Me, I Have Changnesia. Personal identity and trying to change to become better

• Why Care About Friendship? Friendship is difficult, so why go to so much trouble?

• Religion, Acceptance, and Difference. When should Shirley stop trying to save her friends’ souls and just let them burn in hell

• Pierce, You’re Old. Growing old, fitting in, and remaining useful.

• Cool, Cool, Cool. The Philosophy of Abed.

• Abed, We’re Not in an Episode of Inspector Spacetime. The nature and role of Imagination.

• Who Garfunkled Whom? Can we learn anything from the communal fallout of Harmon and Chase.

• Dissecting a Debate. Which school should’ve of won the debate: Is Man Evil? And why is sex evil?

• The Ethics of Drunk-Calling. Friendship, sex, and repressed feelings.

• Whether You Leave the Jacket on, or Take it Off; You’ve Done if For Others. Do we ever do anything for ourselves, or is it always for others?

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm and http://www.popularcultureandphilosophy.com/ for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

 

Holy Hegelian Dialectics! It’s the Superman Versus Batman and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | July 10, 2014

Call for Abstracts

Superman vs Batman and Philosophy

Edited by Nicolas Michaud

The Open Court Philosophy and Pop Culture Series

Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to Superman AND Batman through film, comics, and games. Each chapter accepted for publication must address the superiority of one character over the other from a philosophical perspective. The chapters must be pointed and direct, engaging philosophical tools and theories to highlight the merits and the flaws of the characters—especially when in comparison to each other.

***The 10 to 12-paged papers are written in a conversational style***

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and CV’s: August 4th
  2. Notification of accepted abstracts: August 17th
  3. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: January 12th

Kindly submit abstract (with or without Word attachment) and CV by email to: Nicolas Michaud (philosophylives@gmail.com).

Possible topics include…

  • What’s so Great About Technology? Batman loves Technology, but Rousseau prefers Superman’s “natural” approach
  • Just a Second. Batman, like all of us, is trapped in time, but Superman can travel in it, and therefore has a far deeper understanding of the true nature of the universe.
  • The Value of Friendship. Batman has no friends, even in the Justice League, but Superman has many.
  • Teamwork is Batman’s Kryptonite! Is Batman the ultimate Libertarian? Why Superman’s communitarian approach always wins in the end.
  • Consequence and the Rules. Batman believes in the rules, but is Superman’s concern for consequentialism better?
  • Is it Better to be Smart? Batman is one of the smartest human’s alive, but is intellect overrated?
  • What it Means to Be a True Hero. Which does the Enchiridion deem greater?
  • Does Money Matter? Clark is a small town boy, Bruce is a billionaire, no wonder Bruce can’t connect with anyone.
  • Epicureanism is the Cure for Kryptonite. Superman knows no pain and knows no fear. But Superman, unlike the sorrowful Batman, knows the true value of happiness.
  • Batman’s Extreme Failure. Why Aristotle thinks Superman’s moderate approach is the right path.
  • Batman is a Terrible Role Model. Batman shows the world an immoral playboy, but Superman gives us the honest and true Clark Kent
  • Darwin in Metropolis. In the end the fittest and the strongest survive, and Superman is, by far, the fittest!
  • The Value of Patriotism. Bruce was born on Earth, but Clark, an alien immigrant, knows the true value of citizenship and patriotism.
  • Love is a Weakness. Superman Loves Lois Lane, Batman allows no such connections, is love overrated?
  • Does Might Make Right? Superman is mightier, but Plato would argue that might doesn’t always make right.
  • Who is the Real Superman? Superman is “Super” but Nietzsche’s true “Superman” is the Batman!
  • Hume Picks Batman. Why would a supposedly all-good Superman still allow so much evil in the world?
  • Is Immortality Better? Superman may live forever. But eternal life isn’t as great as it sounds.
  • Earned Increments. Does being gifted mean working hard like Batman? Or are we just born that way, like Superman?
  • The Failure of Forgiveness. Superman can forgive and forget, Batman never does, and that’s why Batman will always win.
  • The Value of Fear. Batman rules by fear, Superman commands admiration and respect, but fear always wins.
  • Masks. Bruce Wayne is really just a mask for Batman, but Superman, in his heart, is really Clark Kent, that’s why Batman is the real superhero.
  • Bravery and Virtue. What does Superman have to be afraid of? Batman knows true fear, and therefore, true bravery.
  • The Worst Big Boy scout. Superman always has another power to rely on; Batman has only himself. Even without his tools, Batman is far more self-reliant.
  • Trust is Stupid. Superman wants to give everyone a second chance, but Batman keeps tabs on everyone, and has a contingency plan for stopping even Justice League members.
  • The Stoic Bat. Stoicism tells us to rid ourselves of unnecessary and destructive emotions; Batman is the greatest stoic of them all!
  • Skepticism, Truth, and Bruce Wayne. Justified true belief is hard to come by. Superman believes too easily; Batman knows the world may not be what it seems.
  • Who Does the World More Good? Superman saves the whole world regularly. Batman can usually save only one life at a time, does this make him inferior?

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

Thank you!

Nicolas Michaud

 

Leonard Cohen and Philosophy

Posted on | June 30, 2014

The Leonard Cohen site One Heck of a Guy has an interview with Jason Holt and more information about Leonard Cohen than I’ve ever seen in one place.

Hannibal Lecter and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | June 23, 2014


Whereof one cannot speak,

thereof one must consult

CFA: Hannibal Lecter and Philosophy

 

Orange Is the New Black, CFA

Posted on | June 11, 2014

Call for Abstracts: Orange Is the New Black and Philosophy

Richard Greene & Rachel Robison-Greene, Editors

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to the Netflix television series Orange Is the New Black. This volume will be published by Open Court Publishing (the publisher of The Simpsons and Philosophy, The Matrix and Philosophy, Dexter and Philosophy, The Walking Dead and Philosophy, and Girls and Philosophy, etc.) as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series. We are seeking abstracts, but anyone who has already written an unpublished paper on this topic may submit it in its entirety. Potential contributors may want to examine other volumes in the Open Court series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to OITNB (including the book by Piper Kerman). The editors are especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues/topics/concepts in OITNB in creative and non-standard ways.

Please feel free to forward this to anyone writing within a philosophic discipline who might be interested in contributing.

Contributor Guidelines:

1. Abstract of paper (100–750 words)

2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the paper

3. Initial submission may be made by mail or email (we prefer e-mail with MS Word attachment)

4. Submission deadline: September 1, 2014 (we are looking to complete the entire ms by December 31, 2014, so early submissions are encouraged and welcomed!)

Mail: Richard Greene
Department of Political Science and Philosophy
Weber State University
1203 University Circle
Ogden, UT 84408-1203

Email:

rgreene@weber.edu

rachelrobison@weber.edu

CFA: Perry Mason and Philosophy

Posted on | June 11, 2014

Call for Abstracts: Perry Mason and PhilosophyEdited by Heather Rivera and Robert Arp- Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: munkzilla1@gmail.com
- Abstracts due: August 1, 2014
- Notification of accepted abstracts: August 15, 2014
- First drafts of papers due: December 1, 2014
- 3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience
- Papers must frequently refer to characters, events, and stories in the Perry Mason books, TV episodes, and movies
- A new movie starring Robert Downey Jr. is due out in 2014Any relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities:- The ethical ramifications of the PM’s legal practices
- Is manipulating evidence ever acceptable?
- The good and just society: the effects of PM on society’s behavior.
- PM’s deductive/reductive abilities, do they make for a modern day philosopher?
- A virtue ethics view of PM: can he look himself in the mirror after every trial?
- PM the internal justifier: intuition carries over the court room.
- The proof of guilt: how logic plays a role in PM stories.
- Causation and PM: do the lawyer’s tactics cause his clients to be innocent?
- The predetermined path of PM: will he ever lose a case?
- Does PM truly “know” his client’s innocence? What is the nature of this knowledge?
- PM’s legal counsel: do all general truths supervene on particular facts?
- A theological view of PM’s investigation tactics.
Perry Mason and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy Series:http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm. Submit ideas for possible future PCP books to the series editor, George A. Reisch, at pcpideas at  gmail.com

Downton Abbey and Philosophy, CFA

Posted on | June 5, 2014

Call for Abstracts: Downton Abbey and Philosophy

Edited by Adam Barkman and Robert Arp

- Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to: adam_barkman@hotmail.com
- Abstracts due: August 1, 2014
- Notification of accepted abstracts: August 15, 2014
- First drafts of papers due: December 1, 2014
- 3,000 to 3,500-word philosophy papers are written in a conversational style for a lay audience
- Papers must frequently and substantively refer to characters, events, and stories in Downton Abbey

Any relevant topic considered, but here are some possibilities:

- Is There One Carson or Two? Identity Dilemmas and the Ideal Servant
- What Is Downton Abbey? Reflections on the Ontology of Place
- Is God the Missing Character in Downton Abbey?
- “The Business of Life Is the Acquisition of Memories”: Memory and Personal Identity
- “The Person I Was With Him”: Mary Crawley and the Failure of Solipsism
- “The Price of Great Love Is Great Misery”: Lord Grantham and the Buddha on Attachment
- “When One Losses a Child, Is it Ever Really Over?” Personal Identity and the Overlapping of Egos
- Matthew Is Still Matthew: The Soul, Physical Disability and Identity
- “The Estate Must Be a Major Employer”: Is There Such Thing as a Social Entity?
- “Don’t You Believe in Spirits Then?” Daisy and the New Spiritualist Movement
- Knowledge Is Power: Bacon, Barrow and Knowledge as Means to an End
- Justified True Bates: Does Bates Know Who Raped Anna?
- “You Should Take Everything as a Compliment”: Violet Crawley’s Willful Ignorance or Virtue Epistemology?
- Who Should Punish Mr. Green? Hobbes, Bates and Social Contract
- “What Is a ‘Weekend’?” Violet Crawley, Aristotle and Leisure
- “Damaged Goods”? Lady Mary, Women and the Problem of Sex before Marriage
- “We Never Seem to Talk About Her”: Children and the Ethics of Favoritism
- “I Don’t Mind Lying”: Mary Crawley, Kant and the Possibility of Just Deception
- “Down with Prohibition”: Lord Grantham’s Love-Hate Relationship with America
- “I Am Killing the Wanted Child of the Man I Am in Love With”: Edith, Abortion and Murder
- “I Wish You Well”: Can Alfred and Daisy Really Still Be Friends?
- “There Is No Getting Out of It”: Violet Crawley and Marriage as a Life-Long Commitment
- Should We Be Happy That Bates’s First Wife Died? Reflections on Justice and Compassion
- The New and the Beautiful? Age and the Assessment of Beauty
- Uniforms, Dinner Jackets and the Aesthetics of Representation
- Should the Prince of Wales Be a Moral Exemplar? Confucius, Leadership and Moral Exemplification
- Chauffeur-Lords and Philosopher-Kings? Social Mobility, Luck and Merit
- “Things Can Happen That Nobody Could Imagine Only a Few Years Ago”: Progress, Tradition and Hegel
- Things Were Black and White? The Reason for Jack Ross
- Gender Apparent: Why Masculine Relatives Should Be First in Line to Inherit
- Gender Unapparent: The Sexism of Denying Women the Vote
- “Are We Heck As Like!” Doctors, Lawyers and Other Plebeians
- Manner Absolutes: Violet Crawley and the Supremacy of the Civilities
- Of Morals and Manners: The Encounters of Isobel Crawley and Violet Crawley
- “Her Husband Will Tell Her What Her Opinions Are”? Feminism and the Crawley Sisters
- Married But Not Married? The Unstated Romance of Carson and Mrs. Hughes
- “Every Time Someone Tried to Kiss Me at Heaton”: Varieties of British Homosexual Experiences
- Robert Owen, Tom Branson and British Socialism

Downton Abbey and Philosophy will be a book in Open Court Publishing Company’s Popular Culture and Philosophy Series: http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm. Submit ideas for possible future PCP books to the series editor, George A. Reisch, at pcpideas@caruspub.com.

Thanks for your consideration

 

Discworld and Philosophy, CFA deadline extended to 7/22

Posted on | June 5, 2014

Call for Abstracts
Discworld and Philosophy
Edited by Nicolas Michaud

Abstracts and subsequent essays must be accessible to a lay audience as well as philosophically substantial. All writing should be engaging and directly relevant to the  Discworld books, movies and games. comics or the TV series. This is a chance to engage one of the most compelling, rich, and creative worlds ever made through the accidentally dropping of an egg sandwich on a beach. Potential authors are encouraged to engage creative and challenging philosophical ideas that themselves challenge our own assumptions about the world, particularly if they’re funny.*

***The 10 to 12-paged papers are written in a conversational style***

Submission Guidelines:

  1. Submission deadline for abstracts (100-500 words) and CV’s: July 22, 2014
  2. Notification of accepted abstracts: July 30
  3. Submission deadline for first drafts of accepted papers: Sept. 15

Kindly submit abstract (with or without Word attachment) and CV by email to: Nicolas Michaud (philosophylives@gmail.com).

Possible themes and topics might include, but are not limited to, questions such as…

Moral Questions: Is it right to do steal, kill, and lie even if you have an Ankh-Morpork guild permit?
Social Questions: Who’s the foreigner? You or the people in the countries you visit (on your broomstick)?
Epistemic Questions: Do wizards really know anything if the spells have thoughts of their own?
Philosophy of Science: In a world were anything can happen, does science matter?

Or any other though-provoking philosophical issue brought up by Terry Pratchett’s Discworld!

For Example,

  • Hello! My name is, DEATH: Does Personifying “Death” Make Dying Any Less Petrifying?
  • Wearing the Black Ribbon: Should Vampires Abstain?
  • Inclusion Through Exclusion: How to Get Along with (almost) Everyone in Ankh-Morpork.
  • Witches and Wizards: Resolving the Tensions Between Science and Nature
  • Running to Run Another Day: Rincewind and the Virtue of Cowardice
  • The Power of Belief: Making (and Killing) God
  • Vimes and Thin Soles: A Defense of Communitarianism
  • “Ook”: Why it’s Better to be an Orangutan
  • Knowing the Minds of Others: Practical Applications of “Borrowing”
  • The Will to Manipulate the Heck Out of Everyone: Nietzsche on Vetinari
  • Death Has Your Hourglass: A Problem in Free Will
  • Why Good Men Just Kill You And Don’t Go On and On About It
  • A Feminist Defense of Why Wizardry is Inferior and Wizards are Obnoxious
  • The Disc Exists: Possible Worlds and Ontology
  • The Danger of Music: Why Vetinari Should Have Listened to Plato
  • The Power of Narrative: How Stories Write Us.
  • The Last Hero Can’t Find His Dentures: Why Eudemonia Takes a Lifetime
  • Practical Philosophy: A Guide to a Life Less Miserable by Ly Tin Weedle

Please visit http://www.opencourtbooks.com/categories/pcp.htm for more information on Open Court’s Pop Culture and Philosophy series.

To propose ideas for future volumes in the Open Court series please contact the Series Editor at pcpideas@gmail.com.

Thank you!
Nicolas Michaud

*Funny is good, but not required. What philosophers often think is funny, i.e. jokes that begin with… “Ok, so what’s the difference between sense and reference?” or “A traveling salesman stops at a fabricated barn for the night…” and “There’s this qualia zombie and he walks into a bar… but he feels nothing!” are often not funny. However, non-philosophers tend to think jokes about philosophers falling down deep wells are very funny… i.e. “If a philosopher falls down a well, does he make a sound?” I hear that one is hysterical.

Louis CK and Philosophy, Call For Abstracts

Posted on | May 6, 2014

Louis CK And Philosophy

Mark Ralkowski, editor

Abstracts are sought for a collection of philosophical essays related to Louis CK. This volume will focus equally on the increasingly popular FX network series Louie, Louis CK’s stand-up comedy specials (such as ShamelessChewed UpHilariousLive at the Beacon Theaterand Oh My God), notable interviews, and anything else Louis CK has said or written that is worthy of philosophical consideration. Open Court Publishing will publish this volume as part of their successful Popular Culture and Philosophy series.

Contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic of philosophical interest that pertains to Louis CK. The editor is especially interested in receiving submissions that engage philosophical issues in Louis CK’s comedy and writing in creative and nonstandard ways.

Contribution guidelines:

1. Abstract of chapter (100-500 words)

2. Resume/CV for each author/coauthor of the chapter

3. Submission deadline for abstracts: July 1, 2014

4. Email submissions to the editor at louisck.philosophy@gmail.com

Note: If the editor invites you to be a contributor to the book, the first draft of your chapter will be due December 1, 2014. Final drafts will be expected by January 15, 2015.

Doctor Who and Philosophy, Regenerated

Posted on | February 25, 2014

Call for Abstracts:
Doctor Who and Philosophy, Regenerated
Edited by Courtland Lewis and Paula Smithka

Abstracts are sought for potential contributions to a collection of philosophical essays examining Doctor Who. This collection will be published by Open Court Publishing as a volume in its successful Popular Culture and Philosophy Series. Potential contributors are welcome to submit abstracts on any topic, but priority will be given to authors who wish to write on the following topics.  To ensure quality, author submissions will be provisionally accepted based on their abstract, but final acceptance will occur only after a completed draft of the chapter is submitted.

  • Free Will, Determinism, and Indeterminism: Could the Doctor Have Avoided Trenzalore?
  • Dalek Psychology: When Being Crazy is an Improvement
  • It’s a Mad, Mad Dalek World
  • Impure Dalek—Problems in Species Self-Identity and Insanity…
  • Self-Sacrifice, Dying, and Resurrection: Clara and Surviving the Doctor’s Life
  • Multiple Selves Across Time: How Impossible is the “Impossible” Girl?
  • Empathy for the Monster: When You Care More for “Monsters” than Humans
  • Why the Doctor Should Forget His Genocide or Should He?: Philosophy of Forgetting
  • The Virtue of Running and Hiding: Nonviolence in Doctor Who
  • When Self-Sacrifice Becomes Suicide: The Recurring Deaths of the Ponds
  • Is Doctor Who a Religion?/Religious Themes and Imagery in Doctor Who
  • Relationships in Doctor Who: Marriage, Polygamy, Bestiality, Lizardality, Alienality
  • Let’s Give Peace a Chance: Using the Veil of Ignorance to Achieve Peace
  • Forgiveness vs. Justice: Dinosaurs and Town Called Mercy
  • The Value of Difference: We’re all “Almost People” Underneath
  • Wearing “Shimmers”: Lying and Deception in Doctor Who
  • Tolerance and Intolerance in Doctor Who
  • Beauty and the Sublime: Aesthetics In or Of Doctor Who
  • Beyond Time Travel: More Science in Doctor Who

Potential contributors are encouraged to write creative, fun, philosophical essays inspired by or about the Doctor Who series. Essays must be written in an accessible, jargon-free style for general, non-academic readers.  Topics that appeared in Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside will not be accepted, unless there is overwhelming need to revisit a particular topic.  Potential contributors are also encouraged to examine other books in the Popular Culture and Philosophy Series while developing their ideas (for example, The Simpsons and Philosophy, SpongeBob SquarePants and Philosophy, and of course, Doctor Who and Philosophy).

Contributor Guidelines:

  • A brief abstract (200-500 words)
  • Author’s/Co-authors’ CV(s)/resume(s)
  • Submission deadline: May 30, 2014
  • Final draft of paper deadline: tbd
  • Abstracts and CVs/resumes must be submitted via e-mail to: doctorwhoandphilosophy@gmail.com

Please post this CFA or forward to anyone writing or working in fields closely related to philosophy who might be interested in contributing.

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Since its inception in 2000, Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy® series has brought high-quality philosophy to general readers by critically exploring the meanings, concepts, and puzzles within television shows, movies, music and other icons of popular culture.

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